Major Cities in China

Beijing

Beijing is a municipality directly under the Central Government and the capital of the People’s Republic of China. It is not only the nation’s political center, but also its cultural, scientific and educational center, and a key transportation hub. Situated on the north edge of the North China Plain, it is sheltered by chains of mountains to the west, north and east. Its southeastern part is a plain. Beijing’s temperate continental climate produces four clearly contrasted seasons: a short spring, rainy and humid summer, long and cold winter, and a very pleasant autumn.

Beijing emerged as a city as far back as the Western Zhou Dynasty (1046-771 B.C.), when it was known as Ji. During the Warring States Period (475-221 B.C.), it was the capital of the State of Yan. Ji remained a city of strategic importance and a trade center for the north for well over a thousand years. Then, in the early 10th century, it became the secondary capital of the Liao Dynasty under the name of Yanjing. Between 1115 and 1911, it served in succession as the capital of the Jin, Yuan, Ming and Qing dynasties, thus becoming a storehouse of Chinese culture, and leaving many historical legacies.

Shanghai

Shanghai, a municipality directly under the Central Government, is China’s largest city. Halfway down China’s mainland coastline where the Yangtze River empties into the sea, Shanghai’s location helps make it an important comprehensive industrial base and harbor.
Shanghai plays an essential role in the national economy. Major industries include metallurgy, machine-building, shipbuilding, chemicals, electronics, meters, textiles and other light industries, in addition to its highly developed commerce, banking and ocean shipping industry.
The Pudong New Zone, separated from the old city by the Huangpu River, is now undergoing vigorous development and construction intended within several decades to make it on par with the world’s best as a modern, multi-functional, export-oriented district. This is expected to lay the foundation for the transformation of Shanghai into an international economic, banking and trade center, and a modern international metropolis.

Tianjin

Tianjin is another municipality directly under the Central Government, Tianjin is a major industrial and commercial city in north China. About 120 km from Beijing, Tianjin is an important port for ocean and offshore shipping, and foreign trade.

Tianjin’s traditional industries include iron and steel, machine-building, chemicals, electric power, textiles, construction materials, paper-making and foodstuffs, plus some emergent industries such as shipbuilding, automobile manufacturing, petroleum exploitation and processing, and the production of tractors, chemical fertilizers, pesticides, watches, TVs and cameras.

Chongqing

Chongqing is a municipality directly under the Central Government, Chongqing is the largest industrial and commercial center in southwest China, and a hub of land and water transportation in the upper Yangtze valley.

Chongqing is a comprehensive industrial city, with advanced iron and steel, chemicals, electric power, automobile manufacturing, machine-building, shipbuilding, construction materials, textiles, foodstuffs and pharmaceuticals industries.

Shenyang

Shenyang,the largest city in Northeast China, is the political, economic, and cultural center of Liaoning Province. It is also an important industrial base and a famous historical city. As the host city of the 2006 International Horticultural Exposition and venue for the football (soccer) matches of the 2008 Beijing Olympic Games, Shenyang will soon be the focus of world-wide attention.

Shenyang is located in the central part of Liaoning Province. Its climate is relatively dry most of the year with spikes in precipitation during the summer months due to the influence of monsoons. Temperatures vary as much as 10 degrees Celsius from daytime to night, and in winter they can drop below 0 degrees Celsius, so the smart traveler will plan to dress in layers.

Wenzhou

Wenzhou is a prefecture-level city (or provincial subregion) in southeastern Zhejiang province, People’s Republic of China. It has a population of 7,777,000 in 2006, with 1,336,000 residents in the 3 districts of the city with the same name. It also contains 2 more cities and 6 counties. It borders Lishui to the west, Taizhou to the north, and looks out to the East China Sea to the east.Wenzhou was a prosperous foreign treaty port, which remains well-preserved today. It is also known for its emigrants who leave their native land for Europe and the United States, with a reputation for being enterprising folk who start restaurants, retail and wholesale businesses in their adopted countries.

Wenzhou was a prosperous foreign treaty port, which remains well-preserved today. It is also known for its emigrants who leave their native land for Europe and the United States, with a reputation for being enterprising folk who start restaurants, retail and wholesale businesses in their adopted countries.

Wenzhou natives speak Wu dialect Chinese, like the people of Hangzhou and Shanghai. Geographic isolation and an admixture of Southern Min Chinese speakers from nearby Fujian Province, however, have caused Wenzhou speech to evolve into a dialect that has been described as “notoriously eccentric.” As a result, people from Shanghai and Fujian both have trouble understanding what is known as Wenzhouhua.